Anathema Volume 3 Issue 6

from https://anathema.noblogs.org/

Volume 3 Issue 6 (PDF for printing 11 x 17)
Volume 3 Issue 6 (PDF for reading 8.5 x 11)

In this issue:

Coyotes Return
Police Conduct Business
Gentrification in Mantua
What Went Down
Thoughts on Charlottesville
Call for International Week of Solidarity with Anarchist Prisoners
Direct Action Topples Symbolic
Science of Statues
Scumbag Co-op to Arm ATMs with “Smart Water”
Midwest Pipeline Sabotage

Edited for mb3-org.com

Sabotage in the American workplace: anecdotes of dissatisfaction, mischief and revenge

Sabotage in The Office

A truly fantastic study of everyday employee resistance at work. First person accounts of sabotage, beautifully illustrated and intermingled with related news clippings, facts and quotes.

Published in 1992.

If you enjoy this text, please become a Friend of the publishers, AK Press, or give them a donation here on their website: https://www.akpress.org/friends.html

Attachment Size
Sabotage-1.pdf 8.45 MB
Sabotage-2.pdf 9.53 MB
Sabotage-3.pdf 12.16 MB

Edited for mb3-org.com

The article does not reflect the thoughts of the individuals on this website.

New Zines in Our Catalog

new zines

By:

We’ve added a handful of zines to our catalog:

  • Affinity Groups: Essential Building Blocks of Anarchist Organization – A recent guide published by Crimethinc to forming an affinity group.
  • A Critique of Ally Politics – A zine-formatted version of an excellent essay that appeared originally in “Rolling Thunder” and then was later republished in Taking Sides: Revolutionary Solidarity and the Poverty of Liberalism.
  • The Delirious Momentum of the Revolt – This zine is billed as “the complete works of A.G. Schwarz.” It’s very solid writing from an insurrectionary anarchist perspective that draws heavily on Greece for inspiration.
  • In Our Hands #1 – This is zine is consists of writings by the In Our Hands collective about their work using a community accountability approach to address sexual violence, abuse, and oppression.
  • Insurrectionary Ecology – This zine is a collection of reflections that builds on the writings of the UK-based eco-anarchist journal Do or Die. The zine is a humble attempt to fuse more eco-oriented and insurrectionary perspectives.

As always, all of these zines (among many others) are available as PDF downloads. We’re always looking to add more zines to our catalog, so please get in touch with recommendations. We are particularly interested in zines that deal with practical skills and/or those that offer theoretical insights that are useful in sharpening anarchists’ collective capacity to act.

Edited for mb3-org.com

Greece, Albania, Italy: The struggle against the construction of the Trans Adriatic Pipeline

TACKLING ENERGY
The struggle against the construction of the Trans Adriatic Pipeline
(TAP) through Greece – Albania – Italy

Pamphlet, A5, 48 pages

“They protest against the energy that flows under their house, but inside of the house they want it!” yells the stuffy national-popular bourgeois in the spring of 2017 seeing what’s upsetting a small village in Puglia and spreading out to the rest of Italy. Fights erupted between police and opponents in front of the future construction site of the TAP
(Trans-Adriatic Pipeline), the new gas pipeline which will link up Europe with the endpoint in Turkey of the Trans-Anatolian Natural Gas Pipeline that’s connectect with the gas fields in the Caspian Sea. The new gas pipeline will cross the north of Greece into Albania, where it will continue through the Adriatic Sea to finally reach the shores of
Lecce in Italy, where it will connect with the existing gas transport network.

The TAP project, as most other energy projects, are considered of utmost “strategical” importance by power. A fair enough reason for enemies of power to have a look at the ongoing struggle against this TAP, put together this collection of texts from anarchist comrades active in the conflict and broaden up the horizons as to favour direct intervention
against everything that keeps the energy of power flowing.

You can download the pamphlet here

Vanguard: a libertarian communist journal

Vanguard: a libertarian communist journal

Issues and articles of Vanguard, an anarchist publication based out of New York during the 1930s.

 Posted By Juan Conatz

Source:https://libcom.org/library/vanguard-libertarian-communist-journal

Burning the Bridges They Are Building: Anarchist Strategies Against the Police in the Puget Sound, Winter 2011

Introduction When I moved to Seattle many years after the infamous upheaval of 1999, I found almost no remnants of whatever had existed here. Certainly, I could find other anarchists, but for a long time I found myself in variations of the same conversation: How do we reach each other? What are we doing? Why does nothing happen? And then, finally, I was with other anarchists in the street — friends and acquaintances, but others, too. Who are all these people? We were all in black masks. This was the first black bloc in Seattle in about a decade. Hundreds of posters all over town had announced a demonstration against police violence in the middle of Capitol Hill as part of the West Coast Days of Action Against State Violence April 8–9, 2010. The size of the demonstration was modest — probably around 80 people — but nearly half the crowd came en bloc. Anarchists in the Puget Sound1 had been inspired by recent events elsewhere: the Greek insurrection of December 2008, the riots following the murder of Oscar Grant in 2009 in Oakland, and, most recently, the wild and disruptive demonstrations in Portland.2 These were significant to us for many reasons. Anarchists played an active and critical part in all of them; they showed that people can actively resist the violence of police; they revealed that when people act on their rage, they open a space in defiance of the violence of everyday life. In this space, new social relations come to be as the authority of the state and capital are challenged. These distant fires had stirred the flames in us, and we took the streets that day ready for a fight. But if the mild clashes of April 9 set off any sparks, they didn’t seem to catch in the moment. At one point, cops used their bikes as mobile barriers to push the crowd out of the street and onto the sidewalk. As a cop on a horse cornered the group, one demonstrator tossed a paint bomb right at the cop’s head. Incredibly, the paint-filled light bulb bounced unbroken off the helmet of the dazed cop, whose only reaction was a look of dim confusion. The paint bomb broke harmlessly on the street in a red splatter. Worse, the blow didn’t embolden the crowd. Instead, there was a collective gasp of shock: I can’t believe someone did that! In the end, the police cleared the streets, beating and arresting three demonstrators and capturing two others blocks away after they left. Despite the fact that the police had committed the only real violence, the five arrested faced charges including assaulting an officer and rioting. In addition, the local anti-authoritarian scene was soon parroting familiar stereotypes: those people ruined the protest for the rest of us; violence never solves anything. I went home having experienced a harsh reminder of where I was. This wasn’t Greece, or even Oakland, or even Portland. I lived in Seattle. The spell of social peace isn’t broken here. Nothing happens.

Less than a year later, anarchists were in the streets in black masks again. But I wasn’t lost in what I wished could happen. Something was happening. The occupied streets, the broken glass of police cruiser windows, the undercover forced out of the demonstration with a blow to the head, the smoke bombs hurled to keep horse cops at bay, the youth chanting “Eye for an eye, a pig’s gotta die!” — Seattle was seeing revolt explode beyond the control of both managed protests and state repression. This wasn’t an insurrection like Greece, or even a series of riots like Oakland. But for a brief period between January and March 2011, people broke years of inertia to interrupt the social peace. And, as in the struggles that had inspired us the preceding April, anarchists played a critical role in fueling the flames.

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Edited for mb3-org.com